HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC PARTICULATE-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN SHIRAZ, IRAN

  • Samaneh Shahsavani Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
  • Mansooreh Dehghani Research Center for Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
  • Mohammad Hoseini Department of Environmental Health, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
  • Mohammad Fararoei Department of Epidemiology, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
Keywords: Risk assessment, PAHs, TEFs, BaPeq

Abstract

Introduction: Benzo(a)pyren is an indicator of carcinogenic PAHs and enters the body through the respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, and skin. This compound causes lung, kidney, and skin, cancers. In this study, the concentrations of PM10 and 16 PAHs compounds were measured in the particle phase in an urban and a suburban area of Shiraz and the carcinogenic risk of respiratory exposure to PAHs were assessed.

Materials and methods:
A total of 60 samples were collected from Paramont and Sadra during spring 2015 using SKC sampling pump (for 24 h at a flow rate of 10 L/min). Dichloromethane/methanol mixture was used as a solvent. 16 PAHs were identificated using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.


Results:
The mean (±SD) concentrations of PM10 were 62.73±23.83 and 60.88±31.03 μg/m3 in the urban (Paramont) and suburban (Sadra) stations, respectively, which exceeded the PM10 emission limit value of the Europe Commission (50 μg/m3). Also, the mean concentrations (±SD) of the total PM10-bound PAHs were 19.28±7.48 ng/m3 and 17.80±9.17 ng/m3 in Paramont and Sadra stations, respectively. Besides, the BaPeq was 1.307 in Paramont and 0.814 in Sadra station. Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk (ILCR) values for children below 10 years of age demonstrated the risk of cancer for this age group in both areas.

Conclusions:
this study presented the value of PM10 and PAHs concentration in two sampling sites. The PM10 values were higher than Europe Commission and the PAHs concentrations could increase the potential risk of cancer among the children below 10 years old in both sampling areas.

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Published
2016-09-04
How to Cite
1.
Shahsavani S, Dehghani M, Hoseini M, Fararoei M. HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC PARTICULATE-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN SHIRAZ, IRAN. japh. 1(3):153-160.
Section
Original Research